Kad Luang

kad luang, warorot market, chiang mai market

Kad Luang is the most popular market in Chiang Mai

kad luang, warorot market, chiang mai market

Kad Luang or Warorot Market is a well-known landmark in Chiang Mai and marks the centre of the city’s little Chinatown.

Located at the end of Chiang Moi Road near the Ping river, Kad Luang is a must-visit for food lovers as it offers a wide range of ready-to-eat meals, local snacks and all kinds of fresh produce. A large section of the market features inexpensive goods, such as clothing, fashion accessories and personal care products.

kad luang, warorot market, chiang mai market

Kad Luang is set over 3 levels and is Chiang Mai’s biggest market. The first floor selling food and the massive array of goods on offer at Kad Luang market ranges from dried fruits, nuts, vegetables and herbs to handicrafts, fabric and materials, jewellery and souvenirs as well as clothes, shoes, cosmetics and household appliances.

kad luang, warorot market, chiang mai market

The second and third floors at Warorot Market are dedicated to clothing and everyday merchandise. Since the market targets mostly locals, you won’t find the kinds of handicrafts and souvenirs that you would normally find at the night bazaar or other crafts markets around town. Fashion is mostly casual wear, such as T-shirts, shorts and simple dresses. The prices here are much cheaper than at other touristy markets so if you need an extra pair of shorts or a T-shirt, Warorot Market is a good place to go. Compared to food and fashion, the merchandise section is not as interesting (unless you want an authentic Thai spatula). A wide range of cheap cosmetics and personal care products are also on sale, although the quality is probably questionable.

kad luang, warorot market, chiang mai market

kad luang, warorot market, chiang mai market

All items are really cheap. If you want something, look around, it is probably there somewhere. There are lots of indoor and outdoor shops and stalls over several streets so be prepared to spend a bit of time and have a good look around.

kad luang, warorot market, chiang mai market

kad luang, warorot market, chiang mai market

Thai people head to Warorot Market to browse its tantalising selection of food. Holidaymakers from Bangkok are particularly fond of the grilled northern-style sausage (sai oua), red and green chili dip (nam prik ong/nam prik noom) and crispy pork skin (cap moo) here. Grilled meats and ready-to-eat curries are also popular.

There are stories contained within the folds of a Hmong skirt, delicately painted with wax and lovingly embroidered for a special occasion years ago. Hmong costume is amongst the most vibrant and decadent in all of Southeast Asia, and Chiang Mai’s Warorot Market is the place to go if you want to ferret through truckloads of vintage Hmong fabric remnants, hand-stitched quilts, textiles, garments and baby carriers.

kad luang, warorot market, chiang mai market

Start exploring at the northeast corner of the market, at the intersection of Chang Moi and Wichayanon Roads, where most songthaews make their passenger drop offs. The perimeter of the Warorot building is surrounded by covered clothing stalls and Chinese gold shops. You can enter the main building via one of the dozen undercover walkways that open up to the street along the eastern wall. Here is a good place to grab a morning snack of dim sum, steamed buns or rotisserie chicken before you enter the market proper. Turning left as you enter, you’ll come across a section labelled Area 4. The stalls in this part of the market mainly stock bamboo kitchen utensils, plastic crockery, and temple offerings.

kad luang, warorot market, chiang mai market

Check out the big fruit and vegetable shop next to the Flower Market (Ton Lamyai Market). The sizes, shapes, colours and smells of the huge variety of asian fruits on display is amazing. If you are not sure what the fruits are, ask for a little taste test, most are very obliging.

kad luang, warorot market, chiang mai market
kad luang, warorot market, chiang mai market

Ton Lamyai’s market floor is comparable to Warorot’s, but with more aromatics on display, including dried shrimp. Here, you can buy hill tribe Arabica coffee and locally grown tea leaves by the bag. Another shop sells fantastic homewares and utensils, including quirky wooden teacups, and another woven rice baskets. The northern end of the floor breaks off into a wet market (which must back right onto the Ping River), and a food court.

 

Doi Suthep Temple

doi suthep temple, doi suthep, wat phra that doi suthep, phra that doi suthep temple

Doi Suthep Temple is certainly one of the most important temples in Chiang Mai

doi suthep temple, doi suthep, wat phra that doi suthep, phra that doi suthep temple

If you’re going to visit important temples in Chiang Mai, you’ll in all probability visit one of many millions of temples inside the old city as a result of they’re everywhere. But if you’re going to visit a second temple, make sure it’s Wat Phra That Doi Suthep (lots of people name it “Doi Suthep Temple”). It’s that shining golden glimmer up on the inexperienced mountainside you can see from anyplace in the city. Most non-Thai visitors don’t even know that it’s some of the sacred temples in Thailand, however on prime of the great religious significance and sweetness, it’s an unbelievable destination that can be as much about the journey as you want it to be.

doi suthep temple, doi suthep, wat phra that doi suthep, phra that doi suthep temple

Construction on Doi Suthep Temple began in 1386 under King Kuena (r.1367-88) and was completed within a few years. The temple complex was periodically expanded and embellished over the following centuries. Construction would have been an arduous task, with workers having to carry supplies through thick jungle: the road leading to the temple was only installed in 1935. The modern paved road was a joint effort of communities throughout the Chiang Mai region, each of whom contributed 1,300-foot sections.

According to legend, a magical relic multiplied itself just before it was enshrined at Wat Suan Dok in Chiang Mai. A suitable place therefore had to be found to shelter the new relic. Unable to decide on the site, the king placed the relic in a portal shrine on the back of a white elephant and waited to see where the animal would take it. Eventually, the elephant walked up to the top of Doi Suthep mountain, trumpeted three times, turned around three times, knelt down, and died. The temple was immediately built on the miraculously-chosen site.

doi suthep temple, doi suthep, wat phra that doi suthep, phra that doi suthep temple

To get to the top of Doi Suthep Temple, you have to climb the 360 step staircase that is flanked by these large multi-colored glass Naga serpents. The climb for devotees builds Buddhist merit for climbing up to the temple. On the way up the stairs are these colorfully dressed children in traditional garb that will pose for you for a small contribution, you can also pose with them in the photos but I choose to capture them in a more playful way.

Within the temple complex are a number of pavilions, pagodas, statues and viharns. The pavilions contain the living quarters for monks. A small museum with ancient relics, photographs and old pieces of temple wares can also be visited.

doi suthep temple, doi suthep, wat phra that doi suthep, phra that doi suthep temple

Steps lead up to the inner terrace, where a walkway circumnavigates the gleaming golden Chedi enshrining the relic. The original copper plated Chedi is the most sacred area of the temple grounds. Within the site are the temples and statues, bells, and the museum, and shrines. Wat aspects came about from the development of Buddhism and Hinduism. A model of the Emerald Buddha and the statue of the Hindu god Ganesh can be found in the temple and you can see the sights of Chiang Mai on the other side of the temple.

doi suthep temple, doi suthep, wat phra that doi suthep, phra that doi suthep temple

The Phra Ubosot or ordination hall is the place where the prayers take place. Striking a series of small bells in the complex is believed to bring good luck. Whenever there is wind around the atmosphere is filled with the sounds of temple bells adding to the tranquility and peacefulness of this beautiful place.

doi suthep temple, doi suthep, wat phra that doi suthep, phra that doi suthep temple

doi suthep temple, doi suthep, wat phra that doi suthep, phra that doi suthep temple

Outside this central enclave area you will find the shrine to the White Elephant and the story of how the temple on Doi Suthep was founded. There is a wide walkway around the main temple which leads you to a large viewing terrace with terrific views down over Chiang Mai, weather permitting. Just past the viewing terrace is one of the worlds largest gongs, which makes an earthly rich sound when struck. Give it a try, it is allowed.

doi suthep temple, doi suthep, wat phra that doi suthep, phra that doi suthep temple

Lastly, there is a souvenir shop and a small shops for drinks and snacks. When visiting this sacred place, dress appropriately. Inside the temple grounds, please take off your shoes.

Entrance Ticket : Foreigners pay 30 Baht entrance fee.

How to get to Doi Suthep Temple ?

Doi Suthep Temple is open daily from 05:00 am. – 08:00 pm. ; come early or late to avoid the crowds. To get here, take a red truck (songtaew) from in front of Chiangmai zoo, at the western end of Huai Kaeo Road. The fare is 50B going up and 40B for the descent. The ride can get cool, so bring a sweater or jacket. The bus stops at the base of the naga staircase. If you’d rather not climb the 306 steps, a special part of the experience, there’s a funicular railway to the top for 50B. You can simplify matters by booking a half-day trip though any tour agency in Chiang Mai for around 600B, including a stop at Phuping Palace or Meo Hilltribe Village that you can choose one.